Commercializing business education

GOING GLOBAL requires capital, a market orientation, sales capability, operational agility, and the ability to execute quickly. Some business schools cannot rise to the challenge because of limited resources, an overly inward focus, aversion to commercialization, slow-moving bureaucracy, and cumbersome rules, regulations, and procedures. Private education corporations can succeed where these business schools have failed. They can tap capital markets, develop foreign market expertise, build an effective sales force, operate efficiently through cross-functional teams, and execute expeditiously. Their ascendancy, however, poses numerous challenges relating to academic quality, oversight, and integrity.

Key discussion points:

  1. Commercializing business education is an effective way of delivering educational services to entrepreneurs and aspiring managers in emerging economies.
  2. Doing so is fraught with risks relating to academic quality, integrity, and freedom.
  3. These risks can be minimized through sound institutional controls, appropriate organizational structures, and strong academic administrators.
  4. Such internal mechanisms could be strengthened by clearer accreditation guidelines.

Please let us know your thoughts.  Also, indicate your name, position, and how we can reach you

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